Reports

Antisemitic discourse report 2015

Explicit antisemitism against Jews per se, simply for their being Jewish, is rarely voiced in British public life, or in mainstream political and media discourse. 

The relative absence of explicit antisemitism in mainstream discourse did not, however, make the subject of antisemitism unimportant in 2015. Indeed, the opposite was the case. 

Published: 
December 23, 2017

Explicit antisemitism against Jews per se, simply for their being Jewish, is rarely voiced in British public life, or in mainstream political and media discourse. 

The relative absence of explicit antisemitism in mainstream discourse did not, however, make the subject of antisemitism unimportant in 2015. Indeed, the opposite was the case. 

The year began with terrorist attacks in Paris (January) and Copenhagen (February), which included Jewish targets. Next was a UK General Election (May) in which Ed Miliband, a Jewish MP, led the Labour Party. Following which a longstanding critic of Israel, Jeremy Corbyn MP, became Labour leader (September). 

Each of the above events provided significant insight into the nature of contemporary antisemitism, and analysis of these events comprise the bulk of this 2015 CST Antisemitic Discourse Report. They give a deeper understanding of the apparent contradiction between a relative scarcity of explicit antisemitism and persisting, or indeed worsening, concerns about antisemitism.

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