Reports

Reports

Explicit antisemitism against Jews per se, simply for their being Jewish, is rarely voiced in British public life, or in mainstream political and media discourse. 

Published: 
December 23, 2017 in

According to data collected by the monitoring program, one case of presumably antisemitic violent crime was recorded in 2016.

Published: 
January 24, 2017 in

The first half of 2016 saw an 11% rise in antisemitic incidents reported to Community Security Trust (CST), compared with the same period during the previous year.

CST-recorded antisemitic incidents in London rose by 62% between the first six months of 2015 and 2016. In stark contrast, in Greater Manchester, the number of reported antisemitic incidents fell by 54%.

There was a 29% increase in police-recorded antisemitic hate crime in England and some parts of Wales between 2010 and 2015, compared with a 9% increase across all hate crime categories. Between 2013–14 and 2014–15, police-recorded antisemitic crime increased by 97%, compared with 26% across all hate crime categories.

A survey of British Jewish people by the Institute for Jewish Policy Research found that a fifth of respondents had experienced at least one incident of antisemitic harassment during the previous 12 months. In 68% of cases, comments had been encountered on the internet.

Published: 
October 16, 2016 in

“All IHRA Member Countries share concern that incidents of antisemitism are steadily rising and agree that IHRA’s Member Countries and indeed IHRA’s experts need political tools with which to fight this scourge. IHRA’s 31 member countries- 24 of which are EU member countries- are committed to the Stockholm Declaration and thereby to fighting the evil of antisemitism through coordinated international political action.”

The IHRA Chair continued: “By adopting this working definition, the IHRA is setting an example of responsible conduct for other international fora and hopes to inspire them also to take action on a legally binding working definition.”

Published: 
October 11, 2016 in

The Department of State submits this report to the Congress in compliance with section 102(b) of the International Religious Freedom Act (IRFA) of 1998. U.S. embassies prepare the initial drafts of the reports based on information from government officials, religious leaders, nongovernmental organizations, journalists, human rights monitors, religious groups, academics, and others. U.S. foreign service officers go to great lengths, often under difficult circumstances, to collect the information on which the reports are based.

Published: 
September 21, 2016 in

The Ifop survey titled “Enquête auprès des juifs de France” reveals a community, largely Sephardi (41%) but increasingly of mixed background (14%), in a comfortable economic and educational position overall, still sending their children to public schools (65%) and ahead of the country in terms of feeling at peace with their household income. At the same time, there is a widespread fear about security, and concern about the levels of anti-Jewish and indeed anti-Muslim feeling in French society.

Published: 
September 1, 2016 in

The forms of displays of hatred to Jews in 2015 were similar to those in previous years, including letters, e-mails, verbal attacks, harassment in the vicinity of Jewish sites, desecration and vandalism.

No physical attack on people was registered last year, compared to one in 2014.

Five attacks on property were registered, the same number as in 2014.

The number of threat cases dropped to three and of harassment rose to 31.

Displays of hatred on the Internet were the most frequent like in the previous years. They made up 182 (82 percent) of the total of 221 incidents, the report says.

Published: 
May 18, 2016 in

Across Canada – from universities to the public sphere – antisemitism has been rearing its ugly head once again. From vandalized cars, spray-painted antisemitic graffiti, anti-Israel boycotts and outright physical assaults, there were a total of 1,277 antisemitic incidents documented in Canada in 2015, a slight decrease from 1627 incidents in 2014, the worst year on record.

Published: 
May 3, 2016 in

On every single count, British Muslims were more likely by far than the general British population to hold deeply antisemitic views. It is clear that many British Muslims reserve a special hatred for British Jews, rating Jews much less favourably than people of other religions or no religion, yet astonishingly British Muslims largely do not recognise antisemitism as a major problem.

Published: 
April 27, 2016 in

A poll commissioned by Hungary’s Action and Defense Foundation (Tett és Védelem Alapítvány – TEV), discovered that a third of all Hungarians and a staggering 41% of all Fidesz supporters hold antisemitic views. The poll was conducted by Medián, one of Hungary’s most prominent polling and research firms. The organization’s director, Endre Hann, presented the findings: 23% of adult Hungarians hold “strongly antisemitic” views, while an additional 12% are “moderately antisemitic.” When explored from the perspective of party supporters, 59% of Jobbik voters or sympathizers gravitate to antisemitism, while 41% of those who identify with Fidesz are antisemitic. The proportion of antisemites among Hungarians who vote for left-centre opposition parties is lower, but still at a level that gives cause for concern: among sympathizers of the Hungarian Socialist Party (MSZP), 24% were found to hold antisemitic views. This proportion is somewhat lower among those who gravitate to the Democratic Coalition (DK) and the Politics Can Be Different green party (LMP). In both case, the proportion stands at 18%.

Published: 
April 18, 2016 in

A Toronto Police report on hate crimes in the city during 2015 found a decrease of 8 percent in the volume of hate crimes (134 compared with 146 in 2014) - but the Jewish community remains at the top of the list of victims of hate crimes.

Published: 
March 22, 2016 in

Die zunehmende zeitliche Distanz zum Holocaust darf keine Ausrede dafür sein, beim Einsatz gegen Judenfeindschaft nachzulassen. Im Gegenteil: Dieser ist wichtiger denn je in einer Zeit zunehmender Radikalisierung. Besonders besorgniserregend ist der immer offenere Israelhass, der sich als Kritik am jüdischen Staat verkleidet, sich aber trotzdem nicht selten antisemitischer Stereotype bedient. Antisemitismus und Israelhass sind der Kernbestandteil und gemeinsame Nenner von Islamismus, Rechtsextremismus, sowie linken und rechten Verschwörungstheorien und Populisten. Angriffe gegen die demokratische Wertegemeinschaft richten sich daher häufig gegen jüdische Ziele. Gemeint ist jedoch die gesamte freiheitliche Gesellschaft.

Published: 
March 12, 2016 in

CST's Antisemitic Incidents Report 2015, shows that last year saw the third-highest annual total of antisemitic hate incidents in the UK.

CST recorded 924 antisemitic incidents nationwide during 2015. This was a 22 per cent fall from 2014’s record high of 1,179 incidents, which had been caused by antisemitic reactions to the conflict in Israel and Gaza during July 2014 (316 incidents) and August 2014 (228 incidents).

Published: 
March 9, 2016 in

With 164 incidents recorded, 2015 has been one of the years in which the highest number of antisemitic incidents has been registered since 2003, despite a significant drop compared to 2014 when 271 events were registered.

In 2015, the majority of reported cases related to serious violent antisemitic insults on media sites. These perpetrators are mostly under the age of 20.

Published: 
March 9, 2016 in

Nach Angaben der RIAS sind bislang 401 antisemitische Vorfälle für das Jahr 2015 bekannt, wovon lediglich 183 in der offiziellen Polizeistatistik erfasst sind (193 im Jahr 2014). Besonders dramatisch: 151 Personen waren direkt von Bedrohungen und aggressiven Pöbeleien (darunter fallen auch gezielte Zuschriften gegen Einzelpersonen und Institutionen) und Angriffen betroffen. Dabei wurden 31 Personen verletzt. Die meisten Betroffenen waren als Juden erkennbar.

Published: 
March 7, 2016 in

The fall 2015 semester was a critical time for Israel on campus. In a central development on American campuses, anti-Israel groups maximized the benefits of existing coalitions, capitalizing on partnerships formed during previous years. Efforts to collaborate with fellow campus groups sparked dramatic changes in the BDS movement, with anti-Israel students contributing to causes unrelated to Israel. Cooperation between Israel’s detractors and their allies resulted in shared ideological platforms, with students issuing joint “lists of demands” to campus administrations. By expanding relationships with campus and community partners, BDS supporters broadened the reach of their activism. This development posed a significant challenge for pro-Israel students, who must redouble their efforts to build relationships on American campuses.

Published: 
March 4, 2016 in

In a survey among leaders of European Jewish communities, 40 percent of respondents said antisemitism is the most serious threat to the future of Jewish life in their country.

The result appeared in the Third Survey of European Jewish Leaders and Opinion Formers, which was published Monday by the International Centre for Community Development of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, based on replies gathered last year from 314 respondents.

The figure is the highest recorded by JDC since it launched its first survey of this kind in 2008. That year, only 10 percent of respondents ranked the phenomenon as the most serious threat facing their communities. In the following survey, conducted in 2011, that figure rose to 26 percent.

Published: 
March 3, 2016 in

Le Parisien newspaper revealed on Friday a survey including five questions about the Jewish community in France and antisemitic stereotypes.

"When you think about the case of Ilan Halimi, which took place ten years ago, can you tell it symbolizes what can happen as a result of prejudices regarding Jews?" 69% of respondents answered "yes, often" to this question, 12% answered "not really" and 19% did not express their views on antisemitic prejudice.

The first question was followed by a series of four questions asking respondents whether they agree or not with the following statements.

Published: 
February 11, 2016 in