Civil Society

Reports

Explicit antisemitism against Jews per se, simply for their being Jewish, is rarely voiced in British public life, or in mainstream political and media discourse. 

Published: 
December 23, 2017 in

CST's Antisemitic Incidents Report January – June 2017, shows that in the first six months of this year, CST recorded 767 antisemitic incidents, which was a 30% increase from the 589 incidents recorded during the same period in 2016. This total of 767 incidents is a record for the first six months of any year. Over 100 antisemitic incidents recorded for every month so far in 2017. This continues an unprecedented pattern of monthly totals higher than 100 incidents for every month since April 2016. The average monthly incident totals recorded by CST are now roughly double the level they were at five years ago.The most common single type of incident recorded by CST in the first half of 2017 involved verbal abuse randomly directed at visibly Jewish people in public. In at least 203 incidents, the victims were visibly Jewish.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

27 percent of young Muslim respondents in Vienna support Jihad, 47 percent hold antisemitic views.
“Antisemitic, homophobic and sympathising with Jihad.” This is how the latest study looking into the attitudes of young Muslims living in the city of Vienna. The study commissioned by the city reveals that nearly one-third of the Muslim youth living in the Austrian capital hold radical Islamic views and support armed Jihad against the West.
The study also exposes the failure of Multiculturalism, a policy pursued for decades by Social Democrats and ecological Green Party, who run the Austrian capital.
The study also highlights Europe’s lingering Antisemitism. 33 percent of all young Viennese respondents held negative opinion of Jews — among Muslim respondents that number was 47 percent.
The study once again shows that other European metropoles too are fast catching up with Paris, Brussels and Stockholm.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

CST recorded 1,309 antisemitic incidents in 2016, the highest annual total CST has ever recorded. The total of 1,309 incidents is an increase of 36 per cent from the 2015 total of 960 antisemitic incidents. The previous record high annual total recorded by CST was 1,182 antisemitic incidents in 2014.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

Combining incident data based on police reporting with a 2012 survey on antisemitism carried out by the European Union’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), this report tentatively compares the levels of antisemitic violence in different countries. The seven-country sample contains comparable data for France, UK, Germany and Sweden only. Among these countries, Jews’ exposure to antisemitic violence appears to have been highest in France, lower in Sweden and Germany, and lowest in the United Kingdom.
Available data on perpetrators suggest that individuals of Muslim background stand out among perpetrators of antisemitic violence in Western Europe, but not in Russia, where right-wing extremist offenders dominate. Attitude surveys corroborate this picture in so far as antisemitic attitudes are far more widespread among Muslims than among the general population in Western Europe.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

The annual report summarizes the data from the monthly reports and analyzes the types, victims, offenders and level of organization. In 2016, the Foundation identified 48 antisemitic hate crimes: the number of cases decreased relative to 2015 (52), but higher than in 2014 (37). More, than 77percent of the incidents fell into the hate speech category, and there was also found vandalism and threat.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

The framework of project examines what possibilities there are to encourage non-violent and non-exclusive public discourse and how to make it more appealing. The authors of the project identified various strategies for reasoning against extremist speech, and conducted online platform tests. The project conducted focus groups discussions with a number of affected groups. During the over 30 group talks, hundreds of individuals-including young people, employees of NGOs, researchers, journalists, creative professionals, conservative thinkers and activists groups that are primary targets of discrimination-shared their opinions.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

The number of Antisemitic incidents registered in 2016 is 13% smaller than in.
Noteworthy is the decline in the number of incidents in and around schools, for the first time in three years. The number of sports-related incidents, mainly soccer, is still high. Unfortunately, since the beginning of 2017, we see a significant increase in this category.
Also noteworthy is an increase in the number of verbal-abuse incidents, as well as the number of incidents in the ‘traditional’ media (newspapers, radio and TV.).
Vandalism and physical-abuse are still a great concern.
The prominence of Internet, and particularly the social media as means of communication is rapidly growing.
These platforms influence strongly the behaviour in the “real” world.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

A record number of antisemitic incidents, ranging from verbal and online threats to assaults.
The number of cases rose slightly in 2016 to 477 from 465 the previous year, when the figure had jumped by roughly 200, the organization, the Forum Against Antisemitism said.
The report follows a finding by Austria's BVT domestic intelligence service a year ago that incidents involving xenophobia, Islamophobia and antisemitism were on the rise in the small country that was swept up in Europe's migration crisis and where the refugee influx has become a hot-button issue.
The report said that cases involving insults and threats had increased by a third to 24 last year, while those involving the internet fell by a quarter to 153. Those involving letters and phone calls rose 7 percent to 198, and those involving damage to property rose 36 percent to 68.
There were seven assaults, up from two in 2015 but below the nine recorded in 2014.
Increased awareness and reporting was one of several factors that explained the eight-fold increase in incidents recorded since 2006, but there was also a weakening stigma associated with antisemitic views, the group that compiled the report said.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

The survey, carried out by the National Consultative Commission on Human Rights (CNCDH), revealed that the French were more tolerant to minorities compared to previous years.
The annual report counted 335 antisemitic incidents in 2016 compared to 808 the previous year — the sharpest drop on record since 2001. According to the report, the decrease in attacks of Jews “is primarily due to security measures applied by the authorities as part of the Vigipirate plan.” The plan, which involves the deployment of thousands of troops around Jewish institutions and heavily Jewish neighborhoods across the country, was initiated in 2015 following the slaying of four Jews at a kosher store near Paris by an Islamist.
The report questioned the “new antisemitism thesis” proffered by the National Bureau of Vigilance Against antisemitism, a nongovernmental watchdog group run by former policemen, that most antisemitic attacks in France since 2000 have been committed by people with an immigrant background from Muslim countries who target Jews over Israel’s actions.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

Looking into the phenomenon of antisemitism in 21st century Greece, this report concludes that "after Auschwitz" antisemitism is not eradicated in Greece nor in the rest of Europe, but, on the contrary, it is on the rise as recent surveys indicate.
The current research looks into the causes and expression of antisemitism in Greece, proposing measures and policies effectively dealing with the phenomenon, based on the assumption that the Holocaust was an unprecedented crime against humanity that cannot be time-barred. The researchers Giorgos Antoniou, Spyros Kosmidis, Elias Dinas and Leon Saltiel confirm in their work earlier studies, registering antisemitism in Greece as high and indeed as the highest percentage in the European continent (about 70%).

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

A new briefing released by Student Rights, ‘Antisemitism on Campus’, details a number of examples of the ways in which antisemitism has manifested on campuses across the UK since 2011.
The briefing documents how speakers with a history of making antisemitic remarks or recycling antisemitic tropes have been given platforms on several UK campuses, as well as detailing incidents of verbal and physical abuse against Jewish students.
It also makes clear that too often student society social media pages have been ungoverned areas where antisemitic abuse and conspiracies are freely shared.
The briefing documents a number of posts made on these pages that spread hatred or repeat antisemitic conspiracy theories which would likely not be tolerated were they repeated by a student or speaker at an event.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

The Spanish government annually transfers, directly and indirectly, millions of euros to organizations promoting anti-Israel activity, this according to a report published by the research institute NGO Monitor, in cooperation with ACOM, which shows how much Spanish money goes to organizations that incite hatred and glorify acts of violence and terrorism against Israel.
According to the report, despite the clear statements made by Spanish leaders against terrorism and the boycott of Israel, Spanish public funding is nowadays being transferred from various sources to boycott-sponsoring organizations that carry out political campaigns against Israel, some of which even have links to terrorist organizations. In 2015 alone, 5.1 million euros were funneled in this way by various authorities operating within the Spanish government.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

In recent years, Jewish institutions which serve as possible targets of antisemitic activities have been provided better security; As a result of the increased security, a lesser number of violent actions occurred.
Although the attacks in Italy are fortunately not very frequent, this cannot be said of expressions of ideological or political hostility, aversion and prejudices towards Jews and more often towards Israel.
For several years, we have witnessed a profound change in the public discourse of active and rapidly growing minority groups resulting in a lower culture of respect for Jewish memory, the use of clichés, anti-Jewish stereotypes, official endorsement of antisemitism, politicians dwarfing the Holocaust, newspaper articles containing conspiracy statements.
Antisemitic stereotypes continue to exist in private and public conversations; sometimes antisemitism is expressed even in the media. This happened in a private radio network that broadcasts a program in several chapters to promote the conspiracy theories of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

The number of Antisemitic incidents registered in 2016 is 13% smaller than in.
Noteworthy is the decline in the number of incidents in and around schools, for the first time in three years. The number of sports-related incidents, mainly soccer, is still high. Unfortunately, since the beginning of 2017, we see a significant increase in this category.
Also noteworthy is an increase in the number of verbal-abuse incidents, as well as the number of incidents in the ‘traditional’ media (newspapers, radio and TV.).
Vandalism and physical-abuse are still a great concern.
The prominence of Internet, and particularly the social media as means of communication is rapidly growing.
These platforms influence strongly the behaviour in the “real” world.

Published: 
July 11, 2017 in

The survey conducted by the Action and Protection Foundation provided interesting results. In November of 2016, Median Public Opinion and Market Research made a comprehensive survey asking 1200 people about their relation to the Jewish people and the Holocaust. Alongside the opinions and images about Jewish people, the frequency and intensity of antisemitic prejudices were also examined.

Published: 
July 10, 2017 in

This study, written by JPR Associate Fellow Professor Lars Dencik and his co-author, Karl Morosi, explores the character of antisemitism in contemporary Europe. It presents some perspectives on the development of three distinct types of antisemitism, which, the authors argue, are empirically different from each other. Their findings indicate that each type is based on a particular underlying philosophy, is held by sociologically distinct groups of people, and is manifested in different ways.

Published: 
July 10, 2017 in

The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) will present a new publication to assist governments in addressing the security needs of Jewish communities at a launch event in the Parliamentary Society of the German Bundestag on 15 May, 2017.

Published: 
July 10, 2017 in