International

Reports

This annual report compiles the available evidence on antisemitic incidents collected
by international, governmental and non-governmental sources, covering the period
1 January 2005–31 December 2015, where data are available. In addition, it includes
a section that presents evidence from international organisations. No official data on
reported antisemitic incidents in 2015 were available for eight Member States by the
time this report was compiled in September 2016.

Published: 
July 28, 2017 in

“All IHRA Member Countries share concern that incidents of antisemitism are steadily rising and agree that IHRA’s Member Countries and indeed IHRA’s experts need political tools with which to fight this scourge. IHRA’s 31 member countries- 24 of which are EU member countries- are committed to the Stockholm Declaration and thereby to fighting the evil of antisemitism through coordinated international political action.”

The IHRA Chair continued: “By adopting this working definition, the IHRA is setting an example of responsible conduct for other international fora and hopes to inspire them also to take action on a legally binding working definition.”

Published: 
October 11, 2016 in

Each year, as an introduction to its annual report, ECRI outlines the main trends in the fields of racism, racial discrimination1, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance in Europe.

Published: 
July 1, 2015 in

European Parliament Working Group on Antisemitism Incidents Report.

Published: 
November 1, 2014 in

‘Official data’ is understood here as that collected by law enforcement agencies, criminal justice systems and relevant state ministries at the national level. ‘Unofficial data’ refers to data collected by non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and civil society organisations (CSOs). This update compiles available data on antisemitic incidents collected by international, governmental and non-governmental sources, covering the period 1 January 2003–31 December 2013. No data on manifestations of antisemitism were available for Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Romania and Slovenia at the time this update was compiled.

This is the 10th in a series of yearly updates about data collected on antisemitism published by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and its predecessor, the European Union Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC).

Published: 
October 1, 2014 in

The survey was carried out online, and the eight EU Member States covered are home to over 90 % of the EU’s estimated Jewish population.9 In the absence of other reliable sampling frames, FRA opted to use online surveying as it allowed respondents to complete the survey at their own pace, while also informing them about FRA, the organisations managing the data collection and how the collected data would be used. This method had the potential to allow all interested self-identified Jewish people in the EU Member States surveyed to take part and share their experiences. It was also the method which could most easily survey respondents from all the selected EU Member States under equal conditions. This method is, however, unable to deliver a random probability sample fulfilling the statistical criteria for representativeness

Published: 
April 1, 2013 in

Gli ebrei dell’Unione europea (UE) continuano a subire insulti, episodi di
discriminazione, molestie e persino atti di violenza fisica che, nonostante
gli sforzi concertati da parte sia dell’UE che dei suoi Stati membri, non
sembrano svanire nel passato. Sebbene la legge garantisca molti diritti
importanti, le possibilità del popolo ebraico di godere di tali diritti nella
realtà continuano ad essere ostacolate da pregiudizi diffusi e di lunga data.
L’indagine on-line condotta dalla FRA sulle esperienze di discriminazione
e reati generati dall’odio vissute dal popolo ebraico in otto Stati membri
dell’UE, rivela un diffuso timore di antisemitismo su Internet e di
vittimizzazione; un preoccupante livello di discriminazione antisemita,
in particolare sul lavoro e negli istituti scolastici; preoccupazione per
la negazione e la banalizzazione dell’Olocausto e per i reati generali
dall’odio. L’indagine evidenzia anche altri problemi connessi, come ad
esempio il fatto che le vittime non denunciano i reati di antisemitismo

Published: 
January 1, 2013 in

Gli ebrei dell’Unione europea (UE) continuano a subire insulti, episodi di discriminazione, molestie e persino atti di violenza fisica che, nonostante gli sforzi concertati da parte sia dell’UE che dei suoi Stati membri, non sembrano svanire nel passato. Sebbene la legge garantisca molti diritti importanti, le possibilità del popolo ebraico di godere di tali diritti nella realtà continuano ad essere ostacolate da pregiudizi diffusi e di lunga data.

Published: 
January 1, 2013 in

Die Ergebnisse der FRA‑Online‑Erhebung zu den Erfahrungen der jüdischen Bevölkerung mit Diskriminierung und Hasskriminalität in acht EU‑Mitgliedstaaten haben ergeben, dass eine weit verbreitete Angst vor Antisemitismus im Internet und vor Viktimisierung besteht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen auch, dass antisemitische Diskriminierung in besorgniserregendem Ausmaß – besonders am Arbeitsplatz und in Bildungseinrichtungen – besteht. Grund zur Sorge besteht auch in Sachen Holocaustleugnung und -verharmlosung sowie Hasskriminalität. Auch hiermit verbundene
Probleme werden in der Erhebung aufgeworfen, wie die Tatsache, dass antisemitische Verbrechen von Opfern nicht zur Anzeige gebracht werden

Published: 
January 1, 2013 in

This working paper is the eighth update of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) overview of Manifestations of antisemitism in the EU. It outlines the broad contours of antisemitism in the European Union (EU).
The update assembles statistical data covering the period 1 January 2001–31 December 2011 (where available) on antisemitic incidents collected by international, governmental and non-governmental sources. Notable antisemitic incidents that occurred in 2011 are highlighted throughout the update to reveal the reality behind the figures. No data were available for Estonia, Luxembourg (where no data are collected), Malta, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia at the time this working paper was compiled.

Published: 
June 1, 2012 in

This EUMC report on antisemitism in Europe has four main intentions:

• The report aims to raise awareness on the development of antisemitism
in Europe in recent years and to stimulate a broader public debate in
order to generate pressure for clear and strong measures against it.

• To this end, the report presents, country by country, the data and
information on antisemitism which was provided by the RAXEN
network of the EUMC for the years 2002-2003 in 15 Member States of
the European Union. This is followed by a critical evaluation of each
country report with regard to the availability and quality of this data on
antisemitism. On the basis of this evaluation, an identification is made
of the problem areas and gaps regarding the present processes of data
collection and the currently available data in the 15 EU Member States.

• Thirdly, the report aims to develop a theoretical and conceptual
foundation as basis for both the evaluation of present data collection
processes and for proposals for future data collection on antisemitism.
In doing so, it will refer to the debates on recent claims that a “new
antisemitism” has emerged. It will also address the question of whether
and when anti-Zionism and “unbalanced” criticism of Israel is to be
regarded as antisemitism.

• Finally, the report makes a number of proposals for the improvement of
monitoring and research activities regarding antisemitism in the
European Union, and makes a number of proposals for action to the EU
and its Member States on measures to combat antisemitism.

Published: 
May 1, 2004 in